P1 - Scripture for Enjoyment

These exemplar narratives follow the core learning chosen by St Andrew's cluster group/working group and contained in the diocesan planning exemplars:
P1 Scripture for Enjoyment short version (click to open)
P1 Scripture for Enjoyment long version (click to open)

 

The Lost Sheep in P1's Mega Story Book, St Bernadette's Motherwell

Exemplar narrative 1:

St Bernadette's, Motherwell


Primary One's Easter term topic and annual assembly was based on Old Macdonald's Farm.  This involved many different curricular areas, including RERC.  

Part of the learning involved planting seeds and growing crops, as one focus was on arable farming.  We listened to the Parable of the Sower, then went outside and planted some seeds: some in the grass, others in rough ground near some thorns, and others on stony ground near a wall.  The children noted that the seeds in the good soil grew much better than the others.  

The seeds evetually grew into plants, a butter bean plant and pea plant.  This gave us the chance to hear the Parable of the Mustard Seed, how the Kingdom of God grows from tiny beginnings.  The plants were then given to the church gardener and have found their way into the church grounds.

As the class was also learning about sheep, pig and cattle farming, we listened to the Parable of the Lost Sheep.  The teacher brought in a big bag of toys: bears, cows, tigers etc, but the sheep was nowhere to be found.  After a long hunt all over the class, the lost sheep was found behind the teacher's bag.  In their assembly, the children noted that they were like Jesus, looking for the lost sheep, as every sheep is special.  

This enjoyable topic lended itself well to Jesus' parables, and provided a lot of enjoyment to the pupils.

 

Noah's Ark, P1 St Monica's, Coatbridge

Exemplar narrative 1:

St Timothy’s, Coatbridge:  Noah’s Ark


As with all Scripture for Enjoyment sessions we begin by looking towards our altar.  One child is selected for the important job of carrying the Bible from the Altar over to the teacher, very carefully. At this point we recall together the various names we for the Bible (which are displayed on the altar). We briefly discuss the importance of holding the Sacred Scripture with care and respect. 

The children are gathered round as we read together Noah’s Ark from our class Bible - (The Big Bible Story Book – Eden bookshop). We read through the story twice, the second time the children can begin to join in. At the end of the story begin to instigate discussion and highlight the following vocabulary – ark, Noah, flood, drown, dove, rainbow. 


The following are a list of possible questions for discussion;
1. Who built the ark? (Noah)
2. What kind of animals came on the Ark? (Two of every kind of animal and bird in the world)
3. How long did it rain when they were in the Ark? (40 days and nights).
4. What did the dove bring back to Noah to know that there was dry land? (A twig)
5. What was the sign that God would never flood the whole Earth again? (A rainbow)

Suggested Activities:
Watch animated versions of the story on-line. (See suggested websites for appropriate links).
Reinforce that God created the rainbow and when one appears in the sky it reminds us of his promise and how much he loves us.  Colours are everywhere and the rainbow has all the colours that we see around us. Discuss the colours of the rainbow with the children. Cut out an arch for each colour of the rainbow. In small groups the children paint their arch and write the colour word onto it. Display the arches together above your altar to create a rain bow.
Remember it rained for 40 days and nights. Discuss the word promise with children. Tell them that they too can make a promise to God. Give each child a raindrop to write / draw their promise on to and display the raindrop promises around the rainbow. 


Create a real rainbow in your own classroom; http://www.education.com/activity/article/make_rainbow_fourth/ 
              

Use movement and mime to depict the story of Noah’s Ark. Ask the children to pretend to be a variety of animals boarding ark.
              

Teach the children a variety of Noah’s Ark Songs. 
http://dltk-bible.com/genesis/chapter6-songs.html

 

Invite the children to sequence the story pictures of Noah’s Ark.
http://www.dltk-bible.com/genesis/noahbook/sequencing.htm

 


Resources used:
Also;
               www.eden.co.uk – Christian book shop
               www.daniellesplace.com/html/bible-themes-noah.html
               www.catholicmom.com

Cross-curricular links employed:
I can talk about science stories to develop my understanding of science and the world around me. 
SCN 0-20a


I can create and present work using the visual elements of colour and tone.
EXA 1-03a


Inspired by a range of stimuli, and working on my own and/or with others, I can express and communicate my ideas, thoughts and feelings through musical activities.
EXA 0-18a



Exemplar narrative 2:

St Timothy’s, Coatbridge:  The Good Samaritan


As with all Scripture for Enjoyment sessions we begin by looking towards our altar.  One child is selected for the important job of carrying the Bible from the Altar over to the teacher, very carefully. At this point we recall together the various names we have for the Bible (which are displayed on the altar). We briefly discus the importance of holding the Sacred Sripture with care and respect. 

The children are gathered round as we read together The Good Samaritan from our class Bible  - (The Big Bible Story Book – Eden bookshop). We read through the story twice, the second time the children can begin to join in. At the end of the story the teacher instigates discussion and highlights the following vocabulary – Jerusalem, Jericho, robbers, Inn, Samaritan


The following are a list of possible questions to prompt discussion;
1. Who came out and attacked the Jew? (robbers).
2. Did the Priest stop and help the Jew? (no).
3. Did the man who worked in the Temple in Jerusalem stop and help the Jew? (no).
4. Who did stop and help the Jew? (the Samaritan).
5. What did the Samaritan do for the Jew? (he cleaned his wounds and bandaged him. The Samaritan took the Jew to an inn, bought him supper and put him to bed. The Samaritan told the innkeeper to look after the Jew and he would pay).
6. Is it ok to only be kind to your family and friends? (no)
7. Who else should you be kind to? (Everyone, even people who don’t particularly like you).

Suggested Activities:
Watch animated versions of the story on-line. (see suggested websites for appropriate links).
Discuss what makes a good friend with children. Get the children to draw or take a picture of their friend and write underneath their special qualities. The children can then make and decorate a certificate to present to their friend.


Make a friendship Tree; Continue to discuss friendship with the children – generate a work bank of positive friendship words e.g. honest, caring, loving, helpful, sharing, trusting, gentle, happy. Laminate these and hang them on your friendship tree. Get the children to decorate love heart shapes, laminate these too, punch a hole and thread a ribbon through. Each time you see an example of good friendship in your classroom the child can hang a heart on the tree.


Introduce a soft toy to the classroom say that he has fallen down coming to school. Get out a first aid kit. Allow children to help put on bandages and plasters. Talk about how they can make the toy feel better. Who can help look after it, how will they make the bear feel etc.

 

Use movement and mime to depict the story of The Good Samaritan.   

 

Teach the children a variety of Noah’s Ark Songs. 
http://dltk-bible.com/genesis/chapter6-songs.html


Invite the children to sequence the story pictures of Noah’s Ark.
http://www.faithfulnews.com/contents/view_content/77362/a

Resources used:
Also;
               www.eden.co.uk – Christian book shop
               http://daniellesplace.com/html/bible_themes_-_g.html
               www.catholicmom.com

Cross-curricular links employed:
I know that friendship, caring, sharing, fairness, equality and love are important in building positive relationships. As I develop and value relationships, I care and show respect for myself and others.
HWB 0-05a 


I understand that people can feel alone and can be misunderstood and left out by others. I am learning how to give appropriate support.
HWB 0-08a 


As I explore the rights to which I and others are entitled, I am able to exercise these rights appropriately and accept the responsibilities that go with them. I show respect for the rights of others. 
HWB 0-09a 


I recognise that each individual has a unique blend of abilities and needs. I contribute to making my school community one which values individuals equally and is a welcoming place for all.
HWB 0-10a

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T: 01698 269114 | F: 01698 275630 | E: chancellor@rcdom.org.uk | W: www.rcdom.org.uk 

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